Author: Van Language: text
Description: pfSense story Timestamp: 2014-08-29 18:12:39 +0000
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  1. First, I can’t begin to tell you how helpful your show and tutorials have been.  After almost 15 years with BSD (mostly Free-), it wasn’t until your tutorial until I felt brave enough to track OpenBSD-current.  Now if only you could write a tutorial on “Convincing the OpenBSD devs to write a device driver for an esoteric wireless card from a company that has annoyed them by not releasing documentation for its devices.”  But I digress...
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  3. I just want to throw in my $.02 USD on backing up configs, and not just data, and not to ignore boxes which don’t hold data.  I was replacing a switch, and I inadvertently brushed the power button on my company's box running pfSense. Just a tap, but enough to initiate an ACPI shutdown.  "No problem" I thought," it will shut down clean, and I’ll just fire it back up when it powers off.”  Well, no. Apparently I had or wound up with some corruption on the disk, including the kernel, which became rather apparent after it refused to boot.  While not an overly complex config to recreate, I have a lot of client certificates for VPN access, and reissuing those would be challenging, especially on a Friday afternoon going into a holiday weekend.  
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  5. Booting off of install media and attempting to rescue the config.xml failed, with a nasty read error message or 2 (or 10).  Gack.
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  7. I was, however, able to bring up the interfaces to the point I could talk on the network.  After some poking around, I found /cf/conf/backup, and all the backup configs in it.  I sftp’d them off, and laid down a fresh install.  Once back up, I took a quick trip over to diagnostics-backup/restore, and restored the newest (actually I guessed, using the “largest”, since the timestamps reflected upload time, not file creation time-note to self).  All back up and running.  
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  9. Lesson 1: All this would have been much easier if I manually backed up config.xml on another box.  
  10. Lesson 2: Don’t forget the golden rule of no Friday hardware changes.
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  12. Keep up the good work.
  13. Van Z.
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